Dec. 22, 1972

The topic of replacing Boston Garden with a modern, air-conditioned, easily navigable arena – free of rats – floated into and out of conversations, earnest and casual, for decades before the Shawmut Center/FleetCenter/TD Garden opened in 1995.

In the 1970s, the Celtics and their merry-go-round of various owners aggressively took up the cause. By 1972, the WHA New England Whalers joined the fray. With their tenants grumbling, the Bruins let it be known that they’d love a new home, even if their crumbling old home was paid for and generating gobs of money.

So, it was hardly surprising when a bureaucrat named Bob Kenney, head of the Boston Redevelopment Authority, spoke up in favor of a proposed arena at South Station, vowing that “If everything falls into place” a new arena would be ready for the 1975-76 season.

Needless to say, nothing fell into place.

Celtics owner of the moment Bob Schmertz, reported the Boston Globe, asked Red Auerbach what the team needed the most.

“I can’t live in this hole,” Auerbach responded. Not only was the Garden a hole in 1972, it housed three hockey teams. The Bruins moved their AHL club into the Garden, called it the Boston Braves, and slid the Celtics back with the Whalers win the scramble for choosing home dates.

You May Have Missed…

One win in the books

Celtics take charge in Game 1 What did we learn in Game 1 of the NBA Finals? The time outs are too damned long. ABC must be making the gazillion dollars Donald Trump will end ...

A few thoughts …

Red Sox still look like a .500 team Floating down a lonesome stream of consciousness, hoping that ABC’s presentation of the NBA Finals achieves the worst ratings in the history of TV ratings … Two ...

Fresh Content Direct to Your Inbox