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Sept. 10, 1973

Sept. 10, 1973 The Red Sox remained mathematically alive in the American League East race, but their margin of error was thin as it could be. They headed to first-place Baltimore for a two-game set after the Detroit Tigers pushed them to the precipice with a 5-4 decision at Fenway Park. With 19 games remaining, they had to whittle down a 5½ Orioles lead. Adding a cruel little twist, Fenway was not their friend in this loss. Ike Brown, whose big-league career included 20 homers in 536 at bats, sliced a ball to right that grazed the ...

Aug. 18, 1973

Aug. 18, 1973 The Red Sox managed to hold off the Kansas City Royals, 6-4, at Fenway Park. KC, to the surprise of some folks, were peering up at the two-time defending world champion Oakland A’s, just one game behind. Boston peered up at the first-place Baltimore Orioles, four games out … the second-place Detroit Tigers … and the third-place New York Yankees. The win, after losing four of their previous six, launched a seven-game winning streak. But manager Eddie Kasko must have known his job was on the line. After the game he was a bit ...

Aug. 11, 2003

Aug. 11, 2003 When a young pitcher is seen as an untapped reservoir of potential, it’s tough for player evaluators to let go of that hope, even when the man’s results suggest that his potential may have been illusory. Take Jeff Suppan, for example. Over the course of his 17-year big-league seasons his final numbers suggest relentless mediocrity: 140 wins, 146 losses, a 4.70 earned run average. In his 12th, 13th and 14th seasons, Suppan hit his peak going 16-9, 16-7 and 12-10 for the Cardinals. The Red Sox signed him in 1995, let him go to ...

Red Sox are what they are

Bloom settles back, let's the season unfold After days and weeks of anticipation, the big-league trade deadline came, it went, and a minor league shortstop is all the Red Sox claimed. Now we have the post-mortems, being ably steered by Red Sox chief baseball officer Chaim Bloom. There is not much middle ground; you agree with Bloom’s approach - that is the Red Sox are doing better than expected on the field, proving that Bloom’s plan is working. This is not the time to abandon the hunt for long-term championship contention. Or you look at the bottle ...

July 27, 1978

July 27, 1978 The official Collapse of 1978 remained weeks away. The ones involving the Yankees are always the ones that history best remembers, never more so than the 1978 model. But the Red Sox provided a sneak preview of what happens when good-hitting ballclubs mysteriously stop hitting, as do they all from time to time. Texas Rangers right-hander Doc Medich shut down the Red Sox on two hits in a 2-0 decision. Boston was in the midst of a 2-7 road and lost for the seventh time in eight tries at Texas. Dennis Eckersley served up ...

July 3, 1958

July 3, 1958 Washington Senators center fielder Faye Throneberry slammed into the fence fronting the Red Sox bullpen and robbed Lou Berberet of a walk-off three-run homer, nailing down the Nats’ 5-3 win at Fenway Park. It was not the lead story of the day. Garnering much greater attention, the Red Sox announced that starting in 1959 they would make Scotsdale, Ariz. their spring training home, abandoning Sarasota, Fla., for the better part of a quarter-century. They trained in Sarasota from 1933-1942, when World War II travel restrictions kept them closer to home. They returned to Sarasota ...

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