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Dec. 10, 1978

Dec. 10, 1978 “Who The Hell Is Stan PapI?” That question, scrawled in white paint on the Landsdowne St. side of Fenway Park, first appeared about this time. The answer, as Red Sox fans over the age of 50 will quickly growl, is the sacrificial lamb Boston received from the Montreal Expos in exchange for Bill Lee. Lee is never at a loss for words, and does not hesitate to answer a direct question with a direct answer. And when the Red Sox, tired of his public  utterances, unloaded him for a journeyman utility infielder, he put his response in ...

Dec. 9, 1973

Dec. 9, 1973 Taking a gamble on a veteran has long been a fairly harmless endeavor. The only significant loss would be financial, and teams with healthy balance sheets would endure that with a shrug. In 1973, the Red Sox were able to dig into owner Tom Yawkey’s wallet and buy a veteran pitcher hoping to regain lost glory. The pitcher in question was San Francisco Giants ace Juan Marichal, a certain Hall of Famer who had just endured two lost seasons following back surgery. He had gone 6-16 in 1972 and 11-15 in 1973  He was a shadow of ...

Oct. 22, 1978

Oct. 22, 1978 A few weeks after Bucky Dent broke Boston’s hearts, the Red Sox management was accused of breaking the law - or, at least breaking longtime owner Tom Yawkey’s heart. When Yawkey rebuilt the ballpark in 1934, one of his favorite features was the new bleacher seating, spreading from center to right-center field. He intended those 7,500 seats to serve as a gateway for all fans who might not be able to afford the higher prices of box, reserved grandstand and general admission seats in the main bowl of the ballpark. The initial price was 25 cents ...

Sept. 19, 1968

Sept. 19, 1968 Since Joe Cronin was President of the American League, the AL offices were located in Boston, where Cronin continued to live long after serving as player, manager and general manager of the Red Sox. So when Cronin fired two AL umpires, Al Salerno and Bill Valentine, the ongoing dispute by the umps to be paid at the same rate as their National League colleagues set up shop in the Hub. Salerno and Valentine were not fired because they were trying to organize an AL umpires union - at least that’s what Cronin tried to ...

July 3, 1958

July 3, 1958 Washington Senators center fielder Faye Throneberry slammed into the fence fronting the Red Sox bullpen and robbed Lou Berberet of a walk-off three-run homer, nailing down the Nats’ 5-3 win at Fenway Park. It was not the lead story of the day. Garnering much greater attention, the Red Sox announced that starting in 1959 they would make Scotsdale, Ariz. their spring training home, abandoning Sarasota, Fla., for the better part of a quarter-century. They trained in Sarasota from 1933-1942, when World War II travel restrictions kept them closer to home. They returned to Sarasota ...

June 21, 1958

June 21, 1958 Upon arriving at Fenway Park for the first time this season, Tom Yawkey felt compelled to respond to murmurs that he had lost interest in baseball, particularly in his ballclub. In a Boston Globe interview, Yawkey explained his absence was the result of other business affairs requiring his attention. He said he calls the ballpark daily, and on occasion has asked someone to place a radio near the telephone so he could listen to the game. “I’m glad you don’t have to pay my phone bills,” Yawkey said to his interviewer, perhaps realizing what ...

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